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[nextpage title=”Introduction”]

We tested the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 (model GV-N750OC-1GI), a mainstream video card that uses a GPU based on the new Maxwell architecture from NVIDIA and has 1 GiB of GDDR5 memory, coming with a small factory overclock. Let’s see how good it performs.

The GeForce GTX 750 and the GTX 750 Ti are the first GPUs based on the new NVIDIA Maxwell architecture. According to NVIDIA, those two chips are aimed at the mainstream gamer market, due to their performance/Watt ratio, i.e. low power consumption compared to their performance. This means you can simply install one of them on your computer, with no worries about power consumption or heat dissipation, turning a basic computer into a gaming computer.

In the Maxwell platform, the GPU is comprised of building blocks that NVIDIA calls SMM, each one with 128 processing cores and further subdivided into four blocks, each one with independent auxiliary circuits such as instruction buffer, scheduler, and dispatch units. The only difference between the GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti chips is that the GTX 750 has four SMM units (for a total of 512 cores) and the GTX 750 Ti has five SMM units, which means 640 cores in total. The GTX 750 was a TDP of 55 W and the 750 Ti has a TDP of 60 W. Both chips support the PCI Express 3.0 interface.

The standard clock for the GeForce GTX 750 is 1,020 MHz, with a turbo clock up to 1,085 MHz, and GDDR5 memory running at 5 GHz. With a 128-bit memory bus, the memory bandwidth is 80 GiB/s. However, the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI comes with a small factory overclock: its GPU works at 1,059 MHz with a maximum turbo clock of 1,137 MHz (a 3.8% overclocking). The memory, on the other hand, is still accessed at 5 GHz.

For this review, we tested the card with its default clock and then re-tested it underclocked to the reference clock. We also tested an NVIDIA reference GeForce GTX 750 Ti card and the main competitor of the GTX 750, an AMD reference board for the Radeon R7 260.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 1: The video cards used in this review

In the table below, we compare the main specifications for the video cards included in our review. The prices were researched at Newegg.com on the day we published this review and do not include rebates.

Video Card Core Clock Turbo Clock Memory Clock (Effective) Memory Interface Memory Transfer Rate Memory Shaders DirectX Price
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 1,059 Mhz 1,137 MHz 5.0 GHz 128-bit 80.0 GB/s 1 GiB GDDR5 512 11.2 USD 120
GeForce GTX 750 1,020 MHz 1,085 MHz 5.0 GHz 128-bit 80.0 GB/s 1 GiB GDDR5 512 11.2 USD 120
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 1,020 MHz  1,085 MHz 5.4 GHz 128-bit 86.4 GB/s 1 GiB GDDR5 640 11.2 USD 150
Radeon R7 260 1,000 MHz   6.0 GHz 128-bit 96.0 GB/s 1 GiB GDDR5 768 11.2 USD 120

You can compare the specs of these video cards with other video cards by taking a look at our “AMD ATI Chips Comparison Table” and “NVIDIA Chips Comparison Table” tutorials.

Now let’s take an in-depth look at the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI.

[nextpage title=”The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI”]

In Figure 2, you can see the box of the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI, and Figure 3 shows the content of the box: a quick install guide, drivers CD, power adapter, and the card itself.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 2: Box

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 3: Box contents

Figure 4 unveils the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI video card.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 4: The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI

Figure 5 shows the solder side of the card. Notice that the cooler frame is longer than the card itself.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 5: Solder side

[nextpage title=”The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI (Cont’d)”]

The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI has four connectors: two HDMI, one DVI-D, and one DVI-I, actually supporting four displays at the same time.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 6: Video connectors

The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI uses a cooler with a 100 mm fan, bigger than the cooler used by the NVIDIA reference card. This cooler does not touch the memory chips. As mentioned, the GeForce GTX 750 has a TDP of 55 W, but on the analyzed card GPU runs at a higher clock rate, and Gigabyte does not inform the TDP for this card.

The PCB is 5.7” (145 mm) long, but the whole card has 7.3” (185 mm), thanks to the bigger cooler.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 7: Cooler removed

The video card uses a voltage regulator with two phases for the GPU and one phase for the memory chips. The voltage regulator circuit uses a digital design and is controlled by a µP1542 chip. All capacitors are solid.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 8: Voltage regulator

The reviewed video card uses four Elpida W2032BBBG-60-F GDDR5 chips, each one storing 2 Gbits of data, comprising the 1 GiB of memory available on this video card. These chips can run up to 6 GHz. On this video card, they are accessed at 5 GHz, which means there is a good margin for safely increasing the memory clock.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750Figure 9: Two of the four memory chips

Before seeing the performance results, let’s recap the main features of this video card.

[nextpage title=”Main Specifications “]

The main specifications for the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI include:

  • Graphics chip: GeForce GTX 750 running at 1,059 MHz
  • Memory: 1 GiB GDDR5 memory (128-bit interface), four Elpida W2032BBBG-60-F chips running at 5 GHz QDR
  • Bus type: PCI Express 3.0 x16
  • Video Connectors: One DVI-D, one DVI-I, and two HDMI
  • Cables and adapters that come with this board: Power adapter
  • Number of CDs/DVDs that come with this board: One
  • Games included: None
  • Programs included: Gigabyte OC Guru II
  • More information: https://www.gigabyte.com
  • Average Price in the U.S.*: USD 120.00

* Researched at Newegg.com on the day we published this review.

[nextpage title=”How We Tested”]

During our benchmarking sessions, we used the configuration listed below. Between our benchmarking sessions, the only variable was the video card being tested.

Hardware Configuration

Software Configuration

  • Windows 7 Home Premium 64-bit
  • Video resolution: 1920×1080 @ 60 Hz

Driver Versions

  • AMD video driver version: Catalyst 14.3
  • NVIDIA video driver version: 335.23

Software Used

Error Margin

We adopted a 3% error margin. Thus, differences below 3% cannot be considered relevant. In other words, products with a performance difference below 3% should be considered as having similar performance.

[nextpage title=”3DMark”]

3DMark is a program with a set of three benchmarks: Ice Storm, Cloud Gate, and Fire Strike.

The 3DMark Ice Storm benchmark measures DirectX 9 performance. Since it is compatible with very low-end systems, we ran it in the Extreme mode, which uses the 1920×1080 resolution and high quality textures.

The 3DMark Cloud Gate benchmark measures DirectX 10 performance. It runs at 1280×720 resolution.

And the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark measures DirectX 11 performance, and is aimed on high-end gamer PCs. It runs at 1920×1080 resolution.

 Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750

3DMark – Ice Storm Extreme Score Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 92535 4.4%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 88634  
GeForce GTX 750 87835 0.9%
Radeon R7 260 85605 4.3%

 

 Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750

3DMark – Cloud Gate Score Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 15677 2.5%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 15297  
GeForce GTX 750 15147 0.9%
Radeon R7 260 14183 7.3%

  

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750

3DMark – Fire Strike Score Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 3825 10.3%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 3467  
GeForce GTX 750 3379 2.5%
Radeon R7 260 3260 6.0%

[nextpage title=”Assassin’s Creed IV Black Flag”]

Released in 2013, Assassin’s Creed IV Black Flag uses the AnvilNext DirectX 11 engine. We adjusted the resolution at 1920×1080, setting all image quality options to “high”, adjusting anti-aliasing to “FXAA,” and disabling “vsync,” then played the first mission of the game, measuring three times the number of frames per second using FRAPS. The results below are expressed in frames per second and are an arithmetic average of the three results collected.

 Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750

Assassin’s Creed IV Black Flag FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 37 8.8%
Radeon R7 260 36 5.8%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 34  
GeForce GTX 750 32 5.8%

[nextpage title=”Battlefield 4″]

Battlefield 4 is the latest installment in the Battlefield franchise, released in 2013. It is based on the Frostbite 3 engine, which is DirectX 11. In order to measure performance using this game, we walked our way through the first mission, measuring the number of frames per second three times using FRAPS. We ran this game at 1920×1080, setting overall image quality at “high.”

The results below are expressed in frames per second and are an arithmetic average of the three results collected.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 

Battlefield 4 FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 53 12.8%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 47  
GeForce GTX 750 45 4.2%
Radeon R7 260 45 4.2%

[nextpage title=”F1 2013″]

F1 2013 is a car racing game released in 2013, based on the Formula One championship and using the EGO 3.0 engine.

We tested the performance in this game using the built-in performance test, using “ultra” quality settings and 8XFSAA.

The results below are expressed in frames per second.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 

F1 2013 FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 80 2.6%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 78  
GeForce GTX 750 76 2.6%
Radeon R7 260 70 10.2%

[nextpage title=”Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon”]

Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon is the most recent addition to the popular FPS franchise. It was released in 2013.

It is based on the Dunia 2 engine, which is DirectX 11. In order to measure performance using this game, we played the first mission three times, measuring the number of frames per second using FRAPS. We ran this game at 1920×1080, setting overall image quality at “high.”

The results below are expressed in frames per second and are an arithmetic average of the three results collected.

 Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750

Far Cry 3 Blood Dragon FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 34 0%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 34  
GeForce GTX 750 31 8.8%
Radeon R7 260 29 14.7%

[nextpage title=”Metro Last Light”]

Metro Last Light is a first-person shooter horror game that uses the 4A Engine, launched in 2013.

In order to measure performance using this game, we played the introduction of the game, measuring the number of frames per second three times using FRAPS. We ran this game at 1920×1080, setting overall image quality at “normal”, with tessellation off and SSAA 4X.

The results below are expressed in frames per second and are an arithmetic average of the three results collected.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 

Metro Last Light FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 56 5.7%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 53  
GeForce GTX 750 50 5.7%
Radeon R7 260 48 9.4%

[nextpage title=”Splinter Cell Blacklist”]

Splinter Cell Blacklist is an action/stealth game launched in 2013, based on the LEAD (Unreal 2.5) engine.

In order to measure performance using this game, we played part of the “Safehouse” mission, measuring the number of frames per second three times, using FRAPS. We ran this game at 1920×1080, setting overall image quality at “high.”

The results below are expressed in frames per second and are an arithmetic average of the three results collected.

Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 

Splinter Cell Blacklist FPS Difference
GeForce GTX 750 Ti 54 0%
Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI 54  
GeForce GTX 750 51 5.6%
Radeon R7 260 43 20.4%

[nextpage title=”Conclusions”]

The new Maxwell GPUs from NVIDIA, the GeForce GTX 750 and GTX 750 Ti, do what the company promised: they offer enough performance for a good game experience even with recently launched titles, at a low TDP. This means that you can install one of these cards even if you do not own a beefed-up power supply. They are excellent solutions for those who have a basic computer with an older video card or have only the embedded video controller of a newer computer.

The Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI is also a hit: with a better cooling solution than the reference card and an auxiliary power connector (the reference card does not have one), it comes with a small overclock. And, because of the 6 GHz-rated chips, you can safely put them to work at a higher frequency, if you are into overclocking.

Comparing the Gigabyte GV-N750OC-1GI to its main competitor, the Radeon R7 260, the reviewed video card achieved higher framerates in almost every test, with the only exception being in the Assassin’s Creed IV Black Flag test.

For all those reasons, the Gigabyte GeForce GTX 750 GV-N750OC-1GI video card receives our Golden Award.